Adventures in Televison (Part Two)

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Immediately after I hooked the computer up to my Panasonic CRT Projection TV, I realized something. I needed a newer, better TV. The television stuff looked fine, but anything involving the computer side of things was just about unusable.

After some looking around I decided to get the Toshiba 52HM84 52” rear projection DLP. It had good picture quality, a pretty good selection of inputs, and most importantly, it looked like something from the bridge of Star Trek.

I got it home, hooked everything up and turned it on – everything worked perfectly. Obviously there was some tweaking needed to get the picture just right and all, but overall, pretty good.

Two days later, it would not turn on. Press the power button; hear the fan spin up half a dozen times…nothing. Nothing except for a malignant little red light that was blinking at ½ second intervals. So I unplugged the power waited ten minutes, plugged it back in, and turned it on with no problem. Obviously it was just some weird hiccup.

Two days later it would not turn on at all, unplugging and re-plugging made no difference. It was completely dead.

So I returned it to Best Buy, not problem at all, within thirty days etc. That one did exactly the same thing after a week. Now I know there is something weird going on.

I returned the second TV, but this time, figuring that I must have some strange power quality problem, I bought an uninterruptible power supply with line conditioning and brownout protection, so the power going to the TV would be perfect. After all, I have never seen any posts about anything like this on AVSForum, or anywhere else, and the service guy said he had never seen the problem before. It had to the power.

Two weeks later that one died as well. The service guy replaced the entire light engine (which is about 80% of the value of the set). Again it stopped turning on reliably after about a week.

So we left it on. 24/7. Staying on had never been a problem, and the lamp was covered by the extended warranty. It worked fine for a couple of months while a final return and replacement with another brand was worked out with Best Buy.

I’m glad to say that I got my new LG 52SX4D 52” DLP set in on Monday. Best Buy even let me return the Toshiba TV stand, which was custom fitted to the Toshiba set. The picture on the LG is not as good out of the box as the Toshiba was, but on the upside I haven’t seen any of the “rainbow effect” that I saw constantly on the Toshiba.

So far the LG has been turned off and come back on 8 times and counting.

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2 Comments

If you haven't done so already you might want to check the outlet to see if it's got an open ground wire. A lot of "do it yerselfers" replace old 2-prong outlets with three prong outlets and don't bother to wire up a ground wire. Weasels.

Just about any hardware store sells a plug with three lights on it for $5 which tells you whether the outlet has a good ground or not, whether you got + and - reversed, etc.

If the outlet doesn't have a proper ground its actually a REALLY dangerous thing to use(SERIOUS risk of electrocution, house fire, serial murder of projection televisions, and red ink on Best Buy's balance sheet)

An excellent suggestion, and one that, despite having a outlet checking thingee in the very next room I had not bothered to do.

Now I have done so, and it turns out the outlets I was using are fine - they both test as correctly wired.

I assume this means falling back to the "Haunted Television" explanation again...

The LG continues, btw, to work perfectly in the same outlets...

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This page contains a single entry by edgore published on June 8, 2005 2:29 PM.

Adventures in Televison (Part One) was the previous entry in this blog.

I Close My Mind Now and I Scream is the next entry in this blog.

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